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Emails show that Biden group knew they were working with Chinese intelligence


J Michael Waller / Center for Security Policy / October 23, 2020

The Biden family business group that partnered with a Communist Chinese company knew that it was working with Chinese intelligence. The Chinese partner was also closely tied to the Chinese regime and the People’s Liberation Army.

Tucked in a Wall Street Journal feature that went online less than 90 minutes before last night’s Trump-Biden presidential debate, the revelation came in a set of emails and texts that former Hunter Biden business partner Tony Bobulinski provided to editorial writer Kim Strassel.

In a 2017 exchange, Biden business associate James Gilliar reminded Bobulinsky that their Chinese counterparts “are intelligence so they understand the value added” by the Biden name.

The relationship was between Sinohawk Holdings, which the Wall Street Journal described as “a venture between the Bidens and CEFC China Energy, a Shanghai-based conglomerate” between 2015, when Joe Biden was vice president, and 2017.

Strassel describes what the text and emails contained to show that the Biden business group knew that their partners were Chinese spies, and that the Chinese investor was “closely entwined with the Chinese government and military”:

Mr. Bobulinski’s text messages show he was recruited for the project by James Gilliar, a Hunter associate. Mr. Gilliar explains in a December 2015 text that there will be a deal between the Chinese and “one of the most prominent families from the U.S.” A month later he introduces Rob Walker, also “a partner of Biden.” In March 2016, Mr. Gilliar tells Mr. Bobulinski the Chinese entity is CEFC, which is shaping up to be “the Goldmans of China.” Mr. Gilliar promises that same month to “develop” the terms of a deal “with hunter.” Note that in 2015-16, Joe Biden was still vice president.

As the deal takes shape in 2017, Mr. Bobulinski begins to question what Hunter will contribute besides his name, and worries that he was “kicked out of US Navy for cocaine use.” Mr. Gilliar acknowledges “skill sets [sic] missing” and observes that Hunter “has a few demons.” He explains that “in brand [Hunter is] imperative but right know [sic] he’s not essential for adding input.” Mr. Bobulinski writes that he appreciates “the name/leverage being used” but thinks the economic “upside” should go to the team doing the actual work. Mr. Gilliar reminds him that those on the Chinese side “are intelligence so they understand the value added.”

The texts appear to show that the Hunter Biden team treated the relationship with Communist China’s intelligence service as something casual. Strassel continues:

Hunter, in his own angry texts, makes clear that his contribution is his name. He rails at Mr. Bobulinski that the CEFC heads are “coming to be MY partner to be partners with the Bidens.” He reminds him “that in this instance only one player holds the trump card and that’s me. May not be fair but it’s the reality because I’m the only one putting an entire family legacy on the line.” Mr. Gilliar privately tells Mr. Bobulinski to show flexibility, since “I know why [CEFC Chairman Ye Jianming] wants the deal and what makes it enormous, It’s the family name.”

CEFC was closely entwined with the Chinese government and military until it went bankrupt, following U.S. charges of money laundering. There is no question CEFC was buying Hunter for influence.

This is something that US intelligence should have picked up. If it did, it would have been the duty of the intelligence community leadership – either then-CIA Director John Brennan or Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

But there is no indication yet that anybody saw any problem.

Read the original Center for Security Policy article here.

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